The WAYNE GALE VARIETY HOUR #31: 31 for Oct 31st w/ JEREMY ZOSS

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DANNO KLONOWSKI is a cartoonist, writer for THE DAILY ROTATION, and podcaster. MATT  RISNES is once again absent, so professional writer, game reviewer, and film lover JEREMY ZOSS does a stand-up job filling in.

FIRST: We open with some UNO HITTRES including: GRAVITY, LORDS OF SALEM, THIS IS THE END, THE ABC’S OF DEATH, and THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK!

THEN: Jeremy and I give our top 31 recommendations for the HALLOWEEN time o’ year!


Comments

  1. Rafe Guttman says:

    I like sequels. Occasionally an existing conceit, particularly when molded by the adroit hands of a new master, assumes protean form. Often, however, sequel-succession falls into a hack’s lap and he simply lines up the frames to trace the original. A sublime sequel, on the other hand, traces a line of flight, leaving the canvas to map unexplored terrain. In this manner, sequels achieve a new level of novelty.

    Nightmare on Elm Street 2 maps Freddy onto a new plane of existence. In breaking the dream-world “rules” established in the original, Freddy is reborn as opposed to being crudely reanimated or abruptly resettled in space or “da hood.”

    Freddy is born again (there is a decent special effects scene which illustrates this point as Freddy emerges from Jesse’s skin) into the oversexed teenage body of Jesse. Freddy becomes the manifestation of Jesse’s repressed sexuality. The majority of Freddy’s appearances coincide with sexual situations, culminating with the pool make-out party scene.

    Jesse’s reluctance to accept his sexuality has unleashed this monster. I contend these inhibitions stem not so much from Jesse’s latent homosexuality, but his desire to remain asexual. This inclination is rooted in our character’s reluctance to mature. Sex is a rite of passage; one rite Jesse is hoping to forestall.

    The opening bus scene is a microcosm for the entire film: Jesse, all hot and bothered (heat is a constant theme of the film: hot bedrooms, combustible love birds and boiling swimming pools), squirms while attractive members of the opposite sex mock him. The bus, now driven by Freddy, careens off the road into a hellish landscape. Even the slightest hint of a sexual situation terrifies Jesse. The audience shares in this horror as Freddy materializes at the wheel.

    Jesse has viable outlets to explore his sexuality. In Kim Meyer’s Lisa character, he has the ideal girlfriend: attractive, intelligent, supportive and willing. And Robert Rusler’s Ron Grady character provides Jesse with a possible homosexual alternative. Marshall Bell’s Coach Schneider too was a potential, albeit deviant, sexual partner. Whether paralyzed by confusion or fear, Jesse refuses to do it. If one pays careful attention, you can notice he even starts his car with a button instead of inserting a key.

    Why the dread of the deed? I blame Clu Gulagher’s character. Jesse hates his dad. He is written as incompetent, unfeeling and cheap. Jesse doesn’t want to become an adult because he fears becoming like his father. If sex means maturity, he’ll pass. The result: a man-child.

    Many point to the room-cleaning scene (the clutter symbolic of Jesse’s jumbled psyche) as a sign of Jesse’s homosexuality. While the actor, Mark Patton, has since come out as a gay man, I can just as easily interpret the scene as childish behavior rather than flamboyant gyrations. If you walked in on a 9 year old boy singing and dancing like that, you wouldn’t necessarily label it effeminate. After all, Peter Pan, despite his outfits, is neither gay nor straight.

    | Reply Posted November 3, 2013, 11:53 am


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