Archive for the 'Cartooning Lessons' Category

How To Exhibit

For those of you unsure about how to go about getting a table to exhibit at a comic convention, New Mexico’s Over The Top Comics presents this instructional video:

The first video in their series, Drawin’ Comics Like We Do, is here.

No comments

Tips and Tricks From Big Time Attic

The Big Time Attic blog has been posting all sorts of wonderful stuff lately, including some excellent “tips and tricks”

Tips and Tricks: Jam Comics
Tips and Tricks: Drawing Out in the Cold
Tips and Tricks: Computer Coloring
Tips and Tricks: The Brush Pen

No comments

Interesting Articles From the Comics Reporter

I was just perusing Tom Spurgeon’s Comics Reporter website and ran across some articles there that I thought would be of interest to you all (check them out at the links below). While you’re there you may want to subscribe to The Comics Reporter blog as well (which is the main page of his site). Tom provides some of the best coverage of comics news on the internoodle.

Why Should I Make a Mini-Comic

Getting Published — Comic Books

Getting Your Daily Newspaper Strip Syndicated

No comments

Places to look for Cartooning Gigs

There are enough cartooning gigs appearing online these days that I can no longer keep up with them, although I’ll keep trying… there is a list on the top of the site (and the left side of the home page) of things I’ve heard about and got around to adding, and we have a section of the message board here that anyone can post their opportunities to. Fortunately there are other places to check as well!

Conspirator Andrey Feldysteyn does an excellent job keeping up a list of cartooning opportunies, with a focus on international cartooning and gag comics competitions (among other things).

The Comics Journal message board has frequent opportunites that pop, particularly for the small-press cartoonist:

Here is another newer site called comicjobz.com focusing on various general cartooning gigs.

The Digital Webbing forum used to be a good place to look for more mainstream comic book industry gigs, although I don’t see much of that there these days glancing at it.

I’ll post more of them here as I run across them… please post others on the message board here if you know of them!

No comments

Creative Commons Launches Tool to Reclaim Your Old Copyrights

There is an interesting post on Boing Boing today regarding the Creative Commons new “Termination of Transfer” tool for regaining old copyrights.

“Creative Commons has a new “Termination of Transfer” tool that could change the way that copyrights work in America forever. If you’re a creator who’s signed over your copyrights, the law lets you get them back from your publisher, label or studio 35 years later, no matter what your contract says. However, the process for reclaiming your rights is incredibly complicated, so practically no one can take advantage of it.”

This tool is intended to change that situation. Hopefully it will be used by many, many cartoonists who want to reprint old work, but who lost the rights for whatever reason. Read more about it at the link.

No comments

Behind the Scenes of For Better or For Worse

For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston is easily one of the best done comics in the newspapers these days, and it has been for over 20 years now. Here’s a behind the scenes look at how a FBOFW strip is created, which is pretty interesting & has some good tips for cartoonists.

No comments

Ivan Brunetti’s 22 Panels That Always Work

Here’s Ivan Brunetti’s 22 Panels That Always Work.

Note that the subject 2200 Panels That Always Workhas been added to the ongoing online jam section of the message board… add your own!

2 comments

Wally Wood’s 22 Panels That Always Work

You can download a huge scan here of the original of “Wally Wood’s 22 Panels That Always Work,” which is a widely used cartoonist “cheat sheet.”

1 comment

Using Blogger to Syndicate Your Comics on the Web for Free

I’m using blogger to post my comics on the web (soapythechicken.com)… it works great, for my purposes. It makes content management extremely simple, and makes it easy to offer subscription via rss feeds.

It is totally unnecessary to have any knowledge of web page building or anything to use this system… the blogger system is extremely easy to set up, and they will host all of your content for you if you want them to (or you can host it yourself, as I do, but that takes a wee bit of work & knowledge).

It is well worth picking up a bit of basic html tagging knowledge for posting to your blog… there are only a couple that are absolutely necessary to know though… the “a href” tag for linking, and the “img” tag for adding images to your posts. Here’s a good “cheat sheet” for html. Really, this stuff is easier than pooping… don’t be intimidated by it. You just put one tag at the beginning of the area you want to affect and one at the end with a / to close it. And you can look at almost any page on the web for examples of how to do this by going to the view> source option in your browser. EASIER THAN POOPING!

Blogger will set you up with a basic template for your site to begin with, but you’ll most likely want to alter it. Again, a little knowledge of html goes a long ways to making your site more useful. For example, you will probably appreciate it greatly if you make the width of your content wider so you can do larger comics without breaking your page. The Soapy site is built off of the main default Blogger template, minima, with alterations to make the page wider, add a header, and to have some useful menus down the side. View the source and you can probably figure out how I did anything if you want to copy it for your own purposes. You may want to copy and save the template in a blank text file before you make any changes to it in case you accidentally make a change you don’t like.

My experience with the feeds produced by blogger hasn’t been so good. I tried hitting the feeds with myYahoo, and it didn’t work. However, I found a good solution… I set up another free account on feedburner.com to produce an alternate feed, and that one seems to work everywhere so far. It makes it so folks can go to the page and click on a button for their preferred news reader, as well, which is nice. See the Soapy the Chicken Feed here:

http://feeds.feedburner.com/SoapyTheChicken

Here’s the blogger feed to compare it to, if you’re interested:

http://soapythechicken.com/feed/atom.xml

The blogger/feedburner combo is definitely the slickest free solution for cartoonists to syndicate themselves on the web that I’ve seen.

No comments

Self-Publishing Resources

Here’s a terrific new resource for information about self-publishing comics.

No comments

« Previous PageNext Page »